The main Theme in the Movie V for Vendetta

Published: 2019-06-07 10:18:57
612 words
2 pages
6 min to read
letter-mark
B
letter
University/College: 
Type of paper: 
This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

If you like this sample, feel free to ask us for assistance! Our essay writing paper help is just one click away! 

 

The movie V for Vendetta that was directed by James McTeigue focuses on a broad range of themes related to politics, governance, and freedom. However, the central theme of statement the movie puts across is politics. Politics forms the core of the film as the main character struggles to lead rebels in a revolution that would change the political environment in the country. The main opposing political viewpoints of ideologies in the film are Fascism and Anarchism. The British government in the year 2025 represents the fascist ideology while V, who is the films protagonist, represents anarchism (Booker, 29). Fascism refers to a political ideology that focuses on one powerful leader with the power and authority to control almost everything under him. The leader is often revered and feared by his subordinates as well as his constituents (Keller, 31). In this kind of a political environment, the fascist leader rules through force and fear to enforce his core agenda. On the contrary, anarchism advocates for self-rule (Keller, 23). This implies that everyone has the freedom to govern themselves since there is no common standard or cohesive principle that binds all the people together. The conflict between these two political viewpoints is evident throughout the film.

The British Government is led by a fascist party, the Norsefire party, which enforces its fascist ideologies in the country. The political leadership has turned the country into a police state, with many members of the opposition exterminated in various concentration camps around the country (Booker, 37). The unfair and inhumane treatment of the governments opponents was meant to instill fear in the people who disrespect the leadership. The government also enforces xenophobic policies that have resulted in the detention of foreigners, Muslims, homosexuals, and any other individuals who were deemed unwanted in the British society (Williams, 17). The government also ruled through fear mongering through mass media, strict government surveillance, and increased torture. The wider society is also rotten as a result of the weak leadership. Consequently, there are instances of massive corruption and religious hypocrisy that characterize relations among the people.

The policies initiated by the government seem only to benefit those in leadership at the expense of the masses. For instance, the health program the government launched resulted in serious health complications, which only the government could cure. This was meant to make people submissive and reliant on the government for their health problems (Williams, 19).

On the other hand, V stands for freedom and emancipation from a repressive political regime. He strives to create a free society by urging citizens to join him in his revolutionary mission that would see each one free to govern themselves. He inspires Evey Hammond, a young woman he had rescued to join him on his course. V embarks on a mission to capture and murder his former captives with the intention of bringing down the government.

The political scenario portrayed in the film is reminiscent of the political situation in many countries today. There are several political ideologies with each government implementing its agenda in a different way. However, the urge for people to remain free in a state that limits personal freedom is the most important aspect of the contemporary political sphere, much as it is in the movie (Williams, 21).

Works Cited

Booker, M. Keith, M. "V for Vendetta" May Contain Graphic Material: Comic Books, Graphic Novels, and Film. Praeger, 2007. Print.

Keller, James, R. V For Vendetta As Cultural Pastiche: A Critical Study of the Graphic Novel and Film. McFarland, 2008. Print.

Williams, Tony (2006). "Assessing V For Vendetta". CineAction, (2006), 70: 1623. Print.

 

sheldon

Request Removal

If you are the original author of this essay and no longer wish to have it published on the SpeedyPaper website, please click below to request its removal: